The History of the Masonic Blue Slipper

blue slipper

Have you ever noticed a Masonic lady or perhaps a widow wearing a blue slipper pin? A woman wearing this symbol is under the protection of all Masons. Here’s the story…

The symbolism comes from the Bible, specifically the Book of Ruth. In the story, a man named Elimelech took his wife Naomi and their two sons out of Bethlehem to the land of Moab. Then, after the two sons were married, Elimelech and both of Naomi’s sons died.  Naomi returned to Bethlehem with her widowed daughter-in-law Ruth. They were able to stay with a relative of Elimelech’s named Boaz, who had a farm outside of town. Boaz fell in love with Ruth, but due to the laws at the time, this was a little bit complicated.

Boaz set up court at the city gate (as was the custom) and asked the closest kinsman of Elimelech to settle all of his accounts (in essence, settle the debts of his death). When the kinsman could not take care of everything in the estate, Boaz stepped forward and said he would take care of the entire estate. As was the custom – the kinsman removed his shoe and offered it to Boaz to seal the deal. Boaz accepted the shoe and held it up for the crowd to symbolize that the deal had been made.

Boaz was then able to take Ruth as his wife, and their son Obed became the father of Jesse and the grandfather of King David.

The shoe is the symbol of a promise, and the Masonic blue color is a symbol of perfection. The blue of the sky does not fade and is everlasting. The Masonic Blue Slipper represents that this woman is the relative of a Mason, and is thereby under the protection of all Masons and the unfading oath of all Masons to protect widows and orphans.

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